THE ISSUE

THE ISSUE

For decades men’s sexual dysfunction has been prioritized over women’s.  It wasn’t until August 2015 that the FDA approved a first medical treatment option for women's most common sexual dysfunction, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder. While that is a tremendous step in the right direction, the score is hardly even.

With 26 FDA-approved treatment options for men’s sexual dysfunction and only 1 for women, we have a long way to go in recognizing the important role sexual desire plays in a woman’s overall health. The FDA has recognized female sexual dysfunction as one of its 20 priority areas of unmet medical need yet women still face tremendous obstacles in accessing the first safe and effective FDA approved treatment option. 

We believe, as does the World Health Organization¹, that sex is a basic human right and it is time we had equity in medical treatment options for women’s sexual health. 

Footnotes:

¹(WHO, 2006a, updated 2010)

NOW YOU KNOW

Sign the petition and show your support!

We believe that women have the right to make their own informed choices concerning their sexual health; that gender equality should be the standard in access to sexual dysfunction treatments; and that the approval of safe & effective treatments for low desire should be a priority for the FDA.

Will you join us in telling the FDA that it’s time to give women the options they deserve for the treatment of sexual dysfunction? Sign the petition today & become an advocate for women’s sexual health equity.

Impact

  • How no treatment for HSDD hurts women

    Terry O’Neil, President of NOW

  • The impact of HSDD on women

    Dr. Anita Clayton, M.D.

  • Lack of an HSDD treatment further harms women

    Dr. James Simon, Reproductive Endocrinologist

Equality

  • Treatment Options Must Be Available To All

    Wayne Shields, President of the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals

  • The Unconscious Gender Bias in Women’s Sexual Health Care

    Anita Clayton, M.D.

  • Women’s Sexuality is Just as Important as Men’s

    Terry O’Neil, President of NOW